Dental and Surgery Check-In Procedures

We do many dental cleanings and surgical procedures that require anesthesia. This article is written to help you (as the pet owner) have a better understanding about the whole process. We want you to feel comfortable with our procedures. The following simply goes through our steps so that you know what to expect.

 

 

 

 

 

 

1) Hold your pet off of food as of 9 PM the night before; water is fine.

 

2) Come in between 7:30 and 8:00 AM on the day of the scheduled procedure.

 

3) When you come in, a technician will go over a checklist with you. It is an important step because we are making sure of what you want done. In some instances we are doing a dental, removing a growth, and placing a microchip. We simply want to make sure we are “on the same page” and have the same expectations.

 

4) During the checklist procedure we will also go over an estimate of the cost for the procedure. Payment for the procedure is required at pickup.

 

5) We will also get some phone numbers with which we can reach you. These are important in case we need to contact you, usually just to ask a question or give an update.

 

6) During the checklist procedure we will also go over a series of questions;

  • Do you want us to perform pre-anesthetic bloodwork?  Or have you already had it done recently?  Pets over 7 are required to have bloodwork as a safety precaution prior to anesthesia. In pets under 7 we recommend bloodwork, but don’t require it.
  • Has your cat previously been tested for Feline Leukemia and Feline Immunodeficiency Virus? If not, we recommend doing that as well.
  • Has your pet ever had seizures? If so, we need to know in order to appropriately modify the anesthetics used.
  • Is your pet on any medications? Again, if so, we need to know so that we can modify the anesthetics used.
  • Do you want a microchip placed? This can actually be done at any time, but is most convenient while a pet is anesthetized.

 

6) The final thing on our check-in procedure is your signature giving your consent for us to perform the procedure, acknowledging that you understand risk factors with the procedure and the potential for complications.

 

 

 

 

 

 

After the initial check in procedure we will set up a comfy spot for your pet. If we are performing pre-anesthetic bloodwork, that is done first. Then we will give a sedative to help them relax and smooth the transition into general anesthesia. Once we are ready, we will administer a short acting injectable anesthesia, and once their level of anesthesia is appropriate, we will intubate your pet and maintain them on inhalant anesthesia. During the procedure they will have anesthetic monitors on them as well as be monitored by a technician. Typically, the doctor will call you around lunch time to give you an update.

 

After the procedure is done a technician continues to monitor them until they are extubated and stable. The pet then stays with us until we feel they are stable and alert enough to go home.

 

The typical procedure when you come to pick up your pet is that you’ll come in and let the receptionist know you are ready to pick up your pet; they will assist you in settling your bill and then a technician will talk you through some go-home instructions.

 

Pets are often groggy after they go home. They may also feel disoriented and need reassurance. In some cases they are painful; we will send pain medication home with you and that can be administered as needed.

Please don’t hesitate to ask us questions. We want to communicate and educate as much as possible.

Toxic Algae Advisories: Dexter Reservoir!!

Toxic Algae Advisories: Dexter Reservoir, Willow Creek Reservoir

Health advisories for toxic algae levels have been issued for the following bodies of water in Oregon:

  • Dexter Reservoir, located 20 miles southeast of Eugene on Oregon Highway 58 in Lane County7.3.13
  • Willow Creek Reservoir, located just east of the town of Heppner in Morrow County 6.18.13
  • Lost Creek Lake, located 30 miles northeast of Medford on the Rogue River in Jackson CountyLIFTED 7.5.13

Be on the lookout for waters that look suspicious, foamy, scummy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green, or brownish red. Only a fraction of Oregon’s water bodies are monitored, so when in doubt, stay out!

Children and pets are particularly susceptible to this toxin

Exposure to toxins can produce symptoms of numbness, tingling and dizziness that can lead to difficulty breathing or heart problems and require immediate medical attention. Symptoms of skin irritation, weakness, diarrhea, nausea, cramps, and fainting should also receive medical attention if they persist or worsen. Children and pets are particularly susceptible.

Swallowing or inhaling water droplets should be avoided, as well as skin contact with water by humans or animals. Drinking water from these bodies of water is especially dangerous. Oregon Public Health officials advise campers and other visitors that toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating the water with camping-style filters.

Oregon Public Health recommends that people who choose to eat fish from waters where algae blooms are present should remove all fat, skin and organs before cooking since toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Additionally, public health officials advise that people should not eat crayfish or freshwater shellfish harvested from these bodies of water while this advisory is in effect.

A hazard for dogs

Dogs have become very sick and even died after swimming in and swallowing water affected by toxic algae. If you find thick, brightly colored foam or scum at a lake, pond, or river, don’t let your pet drink or swim in the water.

If your dog goes into the water:

  • Don’t let your pet lick its fur
  • Wash your pet with clean water as soon as possible
  • If your dog has symptoms such as drooling, weakness, vomiting, staggering, or convulsions after being in bloom-affected water, call your veterinarian immediately.

Blue-Green Algae: Hazard for Dogs

Blue-green algae toxin poisoning, also known as cyanobacterial poisoning, is an acute, sometimes fatal condition caused by the ingestion of water containing high concentrations of cyanobacteria.

In Oregon, dogs have become very sick-and some have died-after swimming in and swallowing water affected by toxic algae.

Poisonings are most likely to occur during warm, sunny weather when algae blooms are more intense and dense surface scums are present. If you find thick, brightly colored foam or scum at a lake, pond, or river, don’t let your pet drink or swim in the water.

Symptoms

Children and pets are particularly susceptible to blue-green algae. Exposure to blue-green algae can result in:

  • Numbness
  • Tingling
  • Dizziness
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Skin irritation
  • Weakness
  • Diarrhea, nausea, and cramps
  • Fainting
  • Heart problems

If Your Dog Does Go in the Water

  • Don’t let your pet lick its fur.
  • Wash your pet with clean water as soon as possible.
  • If your dog shows symptoms such as drooling, weakness, vomiting, staggering, or convulsions after being in bloom-affected water, call your veterinarian immediately. Acute, life-threatening symptoms from cyanobacterial toxins often develop rapidly. Death can occur within 4 to 24 hours after exposure.

Treatment

Treatment is primarily supportive in nature. Your veterinarian may administer activated charcoal slurries to absorb the cyanobacterial toxins from the gastrointestinal tract. Because the toxins are excreted rapidly from the body within a few days, animals that survive the initial tissue damage have a good chance for recovery.

Reporting Illness

Pet owners are encouraged to report suspected toxic algae illness in their dogs to Oregon DHS at (971) 673-0440. Illness reports are an important tool for public health to assess the severity of environmental problems.

Know Before You Go

Oregon’s Harmful Algae Bloom Surveillance program provides updates to the public regarding bodies of water that are experiencing blue-green algae blooms. We (OVMA) also post advisories on this Web site and our social networking feeds: Twitter and Facebook.

 

(Article from Oregon Veterinary Medical Association website)

 

 

 

 

Newsletter – 5 Ways Pets Reduce Stress

We hope that everyone has been having a Happy Holidays!!!! We wish everyone the best as we head into the NEW YEAR! 2016 has been a politically charged year, media seems to be constantly reminding us of every problem in the world. It is has been nice to focus on the holidays, wishing each other Peace and Joy. I am so glad that we have our pets, they seem to wish us Peace and Joy no matter what. Their lives are a bit simpler and they inspire us, what matters to them is shelter, food, love, maybe a nice walk, maybe some cat nip, a good cuddle. We could learn a few lessons from them. In FACT, there are studies and it is well accepted that pets help reduce our stress. . . .

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Arden Moore is an animal expert and author,”There’s something about the animal kingdom that possesses the ability for us to enjoy life a little better” she says. Spending time around animals can be beneficial to your well-being. Here are 5 reasons to include some animal time in your day.

1) They relax you. Petting your cat or dog may be noticeably enjoyable for them, but the act can relax you, as well. Your touch relaxes the animal and releases “feel-good” endorphins in you too, reducing your heart rate.

2) They may reduce blood pressure. Communicating with animals may lower your blood pressure and improve your overall health. Moor suggests that engaging animals in “happy talk”, or speaking in an upbeat tone is soothing. Thinking happy thoughts when talking to your pet or speaking to birds and squirrels in your backyard may seem silly, but the conversation can put you at ease (even if it’s one-sided).

3) They’re therapeutic. Animals from dogs to rabbits are often used for therapy in hospitals and nursing homes. There’s something rejuvenating, renewing about coming home to a friendly animal that greets you like a rock star. Moore suggests that the strong human-to-animal bond could be related to fond childhood memories. People often feel more comfortable being themselves around animals.

4) They can improve human nutrition. Eating in the company of an animal may improve your eating habits. In some cases, the companionship of animals has helped the nutritional habits of their humans. For example, says Moore, research has shown that recipients of the Meals on Wheels program who were allowed to eat near their pets improved some of their eating patterns.

5) They improve your relationships. A good relationship with your animal friends may spill over into better relations with humans. An animal doesn’t care who you are or what outfit you’re wearing; they want to play and be around you, says Moore. This carefree, playful attitude, she says, has made many animal-lovers more prone to live in the moment. Taking care of an animal can also teach responsibility and stimulate feelings of trust, openness, and companionship. Psychology-Man-Dog-Cat-27980490_ml-21

On a more direct note. We want to remind everyone that DENTAL MONTH(s) are approaching. It is a great opportunity to provide proactive health care for your pet. Dental disease not only can cause oral discomfort, but the bacteria associated with dental disease can affect the health of the entire body. We offer 10% off on the dental procedure, including (if needed) dental radio-graphs, extractions, etc. This has been a popular promotion in the past, in fact we simply plan on Dental month extending through February and March, and possibly longer if demand warrants. Visit our website for more information on dental (qstreetanimalhospital.com).

Heat Exhaustion!


Be a Cool Owner: Don’t Let Your Dog Overheat

By: PetPlace
Veterinarians

 

Working up a good sweat in the hot summer months may be good for you, but it can lead
to heat stroke in your dog and kill him in a matter of minutes. Heat stroke is a dangerous condition that takes the lives of many animals every year. Your dog’s normal body temperature is 100.5 to 102.5 degrees Fahrenheit. If it rises to 105 or 106 degrees, the dog is at risk for developing heat exhaustion. If the body temperature rises to 107 degrees, your dog has entered the dangerous zone of heat stroke. With heat stroke, irreversible damage and death can occur.

Here are some cold summer facts: The temperature in a parked car can reach 160
degrees in a matter of minutes, even with partially opened windows. And any dog
exercising on a hot, humid day, even with plenty of water, can become
overheated. Overheating often leads to heat stroke. As a pet owner, you should
know the dangers of overheating and what to do to prevent it. You should also
know the signs of heat stroke and what to do if your dog exhibits those signs.

When humans overheat we are able to sweat in order to cool down. However, your
dog cannot sweat as easily; he must rely on panting to cool down. Dogs breathe
in through the nose and out through the mouth, directing the air over the
mucous membranes of the tongue, throat and trachea to facilitate cooling by
evaporation of fluid. Your dog also dissipates heat by dilation of the blood
vessels in the surface of the skin in the face, ears and feet. When these
mechanisms are overwhelmed, hyperthermia and heat stroke usually develop.

Dogs who have a thick coat, heart and lung problems or a short muzzle are at
greater risk for heat stroke. Others at risk include

  • Puppies
    up to 6 months of age
  • Large dogs over 7 years
    of age and small dogs over 14 years
  • Overweight dogs
  • Dogs who are overexerted
  • Ill dogs or those on
    medication
  • Brachycephalic dogs
    (short, wide heads) like pugs, English bulldogs and Boston terriers
  • Dogs with cardiovascular
    disease and/or poor circulation

 

What To Watch For

If your dog is overheating, he will appear sluggish and unresponsive. He may
appear disorientated. The gums, tongue and conjunctiva of the eyes may be
bright red and he will probably be panting hard. He may even start vomiting.
Eventually he will collapse, seizure and may go into a coma.

If your dog exhibits any of these signs, treat it as an emergency and call your
veterinarian immediately. On the way to your veterinary hospital, you can cool
your pet with wet towels, spray with cool water from a hose or by providing ice
chips for your dog to chew (providing he is conscious).

Veterinary Care

Heat related illness is typically diagnosed based on physical exam findings and
a recent history that could result in overheating. Your veterinarian may
perform various blood tests to assess the extent of vital organ dysfunction
caused by overheating.

Intensity of treatment depends upon the cause and severity of the heat illness.

  • Mildly increased
    temperature (less than 105°F) may only require rest, a fan to increase air
    circulation, fresh water to drink and careful observation.
  • Markedly increased
    temperature (greater than 106°F) must be treated more aggressively. Cooling can
    be promoted externally by immersion in cool water or internally by
    administering a cool water enema.
  • Underlying aggravating
    conditions, such as upper airway obstructive diseases, heart disease, lung
    disease and dehydration may be treated with appropriate medications,
    supplemental oxygen or fluid therapy.

Home Care

Heat stroke is a life-threatening emergency. Check your dog’s temperature
rectally if you suspect heat stroke. If it is over 105°F, remove your
dog from the heat source immediately and call your veterinarian.

Meanwhile, place a cool, wet towel over your dog or place him in a cool bath.
Do not use ice because it may cause skin injury. Spraying with water from a
garden hose also works well.

 

This article is from petplace.com