Heat Exhaustion!


Be a Cool Owner: Don’t Let Your Dog Overheat

By: PetPlace
Veterinarians

 

Working up a good sweat in the hot summer months may be good for you, but it can lead
to heat stroke in your dog and kill him in a matter of minutes. Heat stroke is a dangerous condition that takes the lives of many animals every year. Your dog’s normal body temperature is 100.5 to 102.5 degrees Fahrenheit. If it rises to 105 or 106 degrees, the dog is at risk for developing heat exhaustion. If the body temperature rises to 107 degrees, your dog has entered the dangerous zone of heat stroke. With heat stroke, irreversible damage and death can occur.

Here are some cold summer facts: The temperature in a parked car can reach 160
degrees in a matter of minutes, even with partially opened windows. And any dog
exercising on a hot, humid day, even with plenty of water, can become
overheated. Overheating often leads to heat stroke. As a pet owner, you should
know the dangers of overheating and what to do to prevent it. You should also
know the signs of heat stroke and what to do if your dog exhibits those signs.

When humans overheat we are able to sweat in order to cool down. However, your
dog cannot sweat as easily; he must rely on panting to cool down. Dogs breathe
in through the nose and out through the mouth, directing the air over the
mucous membranes of the tongue, throat and trachea to facilitate cooling by
evaporation of fluid. Your dog also dissipates heat by dilation of the blood
vessels in the surface of the skin in the face, ears and feet. When these
mechanisms are overwhelmed, hyperthermia and heat stroke usually develop.

Dogs who have a thick coat, heart and lung problems or a short muzzle are at
greater risk for heat stroke. Others at risk include

  • Puppies
    up to 6 months of age
  • Large dogs over 7 years
    of age and small dogs over 14 years
  • Overweight dogs
  • Dogs who are overexerted
  • Ill dogs or those on
    medication
  • Brachycephalic dogs
    (short, wide heads) like pugs, English bulldogs and Boston terriers
  • Dogs with cardiovascular
    disease and/or poor circulation

 

What To Watch For

If your dog is overheating, he will appear sluggish and unresponsive. He may
appear disorientated. The gums, tongue and conjunctiva of the eyes may be
bright red and he will probably be panting hard. He may even start vomiting.
Eventually he will collapse, seizure and may go into a coma.

If your dog exhibits any of these signs, treat it as an emergency and call your
veterinarian immediately. On the way to your veterinary hospital, you can cool
your pet with wet towels, spray with cool water from a hose or by providing ice
chips for your dog to chew (providing he is conscious).

Veterinary Care

Heat related illness is typically diagnosed based on physical exam findings and
a recent history that could result in overheating. Your veterinarian may
perform various blood tests to assess the extent of vital organ dysfunction
caused by overheating.

Intensity of treatment depends upon the cause and severity of the heat illness.

  • Mildly increased
    temperature (less than 105°F) may only require rest, a fan to increase air
    circulation, fresh water to drink and careful observation.
  • Markedly increased
    temperature (greater than 106°F) must be treated more aggressively. Cooling can
    be promoted externally by immersion in cool water or internally by
    administering a cool water enema.
  • Underlying aggravating
    conditions, such as upper airway obstructive diseases, heart disease, lung
    disease and dehydration may be treated with appropriate medications,
    supplemental oxygen or fluid therapy.

Home Care

Heat stroke is a life-threatening emergency. Check your dog’s temperature
rectally if you suspect heat stroke. If it is over 105°F, remove your
dog from the heat source immediately and call your veterinarian.

Meanwhile, place a cool, wet towel over your dog or place him in a cool bath.
Do not use ice because it may cause skin injury. Spraying with water from a
garden hose also works well.

 

This article is from petplace.com

4th of July Pet Safety Tips

Article Compliments of Oregon Veterinary Medical Association

 

Fourth of July Safety for Pets

4th of July celebrations might be a lot of fun for people, but they can be downright scary for our animals, especially cats, dogs and horses. The sights, sounds and commotion of Independence Day can confuse animals and make them nervous, which can cause them to run away or place themselves in harmful situations.

Keep your animals safe with these tips

Thinkstock

To help keep your animals from becoming overly stressed this 4th of July, consider the following tips:

  • Do not take your pets to fireworks displays.
  • Keep pets indoors and away from crowds so that they feel more protected. Due to the noise, dogs may try to dig out of yards, so keeping them inside is a good choice.
  • Animals that are already crate trained may feel safest in their crate.
  • A fan or other “white noise” can help mask the sound of fireworks.
  • Consider boarding your animals in a safe place that is farther away from the holiday action. If you plan to travel during this time, boarding your animal might be a better option than leaving it at home.
  • Early behavior training can desensitize your animal to holiday commotion. It is important to teach your puppy (ideally) or dog how to handle loud noises through positive conditioning. Do not punish your dog for being scared by thunderstorms or fireworks.
  • Your veterinarian may choose to prescribe a sedative for your animal if it tends to become easily spooked by the fireworks. Remember that your animal must be seen by a veterinarian in order to receive any prescribed medications.
  • The 4th of July is also a good time to make sure that your pet is wearing an ID collar and is microchipped.
  • Keep pets away from fireworks, matches, lighter fluid, as well as the food and drinks (including alcohol) that may accompany 4th of July celebrations.
  • If you have horses, be sure to keep them indoors and away from the sound of fireworks.

If your pet does become lost

  • Check the neighborhood (or area where the pet became lost), as pets have been known to be found close to home even several days later.
  • Put up signs with your pet’s photo and your phone number. It is recommended to use only your first name and not include your home phone number on the notice. A cell phone number is preferrable, as it cannot easily be traced to your home address via online searches.
  • If your pet is microchipped (and we recommend that it should be), contact your microchip registration company. Once notified, they may activate a lost pet recovery network and/or place your lost pet on a “hot sheet” or on their social media networks.
  • Contact your veterinarian. If your pet is wearing a collar with rabies tag (also recommended), the number can be traced to your veterinarian and then back to you if the pet is found or taken to a shelter.
  • Contact animal control, shelters and humane organizations in your area. If possible, visit them daily to see if your pet has been brought in. July 5th is usually a very busy day at these agencies.
  • Place a lost pet ad in your local newspaper and/or online, such as on Facebook or Craigslist.
  • Check the paper and online sources daily for “found pet” ads.

If you have any concerns or questions about helping your animal stay calm and safe during the 4th of July holiday, please talk to your veterinarian.

 

Published: March 11, 2009;    Updated: June 18, 2013

Filed Under: Safety, Seasonal Issues, Companion Animals, Equine, Cats, Dogs

Author: Oregon Veterinary Medical Association

 

Pet Food Recalls – Natura Pet Products possibly contaminated with Salmonella. Click to see more

Article compliments of Oregon Veterinary Medical Association

Natura Pet Products Recalls Innova, Evo, California Natural, Healthwise, Karma and Mother Nature Dry Foods and Treats Due to Salmonella

Customer Service: (800) 224-6123

Web Site: www.NaturaPet.com

Natura Pet Products is voluntarily recalling specific lots of dry pet food and treats because it has the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella.

Salmonella can affect animals eating the products and there is risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products or any surfaces exposed to these products.

Healthy people infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. Rarely,Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms. Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.

Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting. Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.

These products were packaged in a single production facility. During routine FDA testing, a single lot tested positive for the presence of Salmonella. There have been no reports of pet or human illness associated with this product. In an abundance of caution, Natura is voluntarily recalling all products with expiration dates prior to June 10, 20

The affected products are sold in bags through veterinary clinics, select pet specialty retailers, and online in the United States and Canada. No canned wet food is affected by this announcement.

The affected products are:

BRAND LOT CODE/UPC/SIZES; EXPIRATION
Innova Dry dog and cat food and biscuits/bars/treats All Lot Codes, All UPC’s, All package sizes All expiration dates prior to 6-10-2014
EVO dry dog, cat and ferret food and biscuits/bars/treats All Lot Codes, All UPC’s, All package sizes All expiration dates prior to 6-10-2014
California Natural dry dog and cat foods and biscuits/bars/treats All Lot Codes, All UPC’s, All package sizes All expiration dates prior to 6-10-2014
Healthwise dry dog and cat foods All Lot Codes, All UPC’s, All package sizes All expiration dates prior to 6-10-2014
Karma dry dog foods All Lot Codes, All UPC’s, All package sizes All expiration dates prior to 6-10-2014
Mother Nature biscuits/bars/treats All Lot Codes, All UPC’s, All package sizes All expiration dates prior to 6-10-2014

Consumers who have purchased the specific dry pet foods listed should discard them.

For further information or a product replacement or refund call Natura toll-free at 800-224-6123. (Monday – Friday, 8:00 AM to 5:30 PM CST)

 

 

Published: June 18, 2013;    Updated: June 18, 2013

Filed Under: Recalls Warnings

Author: Oregon Veterinary Medical Association

 

Dental Month

veterinarian Eugene OregonFebruary and March are traditionally Dental month - which went very well, so for the second year in a row we’ve decided to do it again in MAY.

What is Dental Month?     Well, it is a time period in which we try to increase awareness of pet’s dental needs AND WE OFFER 10% OFF! 10 % off the whole dental package. It also includes 10% off additional dental related procedures (if needed), such as extractions, dental radiographs, etc.

I should explain that we offer dental packages based on pet size. The packages include a number of things; hospitalization, intravenous catheter, fluids, anesthesia, anesthesia monitoring equipment, dental evaluation, dental cleaning with ultrasonic scaler, and dental polish.  These costs are easy to define and easy to provide.

Cats                                  $205

Dogs up to 20 lbs       $205

Dogs 21-50  lbs          $240

Dogs 51-75 lbs           $260

Dogs 76 and up          $280

 

 

Many pets have advanced dental disease that requires further time and effort to treat. We will do our best to give estimates ahead of time, but often it is hard to predict accurately what will be needed ahead of time.  Some extractions can be challenging and time consuming. In some cases dental radiographs and nerve blocks are necessary. These things affect cost as well but are harder to define and provide in a broad article. We can give estimates on an individual basis as part of your next exam, though.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We do require that your pet have had an exam within the year before it is brought in for a dental. Examinations and face to face contact are important for mutual understanding and making sure your pet is healthy prior to any anesthetic procedure. We also offer pre-anesthetic bloodwork for pets under 7 years old and require it for pets over 7 years old.

 

 

Please visit our other featured articles discussing 1) dental disease in detail and 2) what to expect on the day of the procedure. After the procedure we will send home a tooth brushing kit and some instructions. Ask us if you have any questions on dental products. Look for the VOHS seal on products (Veterinary Oral Health Council) ensuring quality.

 

 

Special diet that holds together and scrapes teeth as the pet chews

 

 

 

 

 

Mouth wash with enzymes that degrade plaque

 

 

 

 

 

Treats that also hold together and scrape teeth as they chew

 

 

 

 

 

The above at home products are good, but nowhere near as effective as brushing.