At Home Dog Neuter Attempt

At the beginning of November a Pit Bull mix was abandoned in front of Safeway. A good Samaritan saw that the dog needed help and rescued him. The dog is young (around a year old) and very sweet. We are calling him “Buddy”. He was not only lucky to be rescued because he was abandoned but because he also had a gaping wound where his scrotum should be and he needed medical care. We were able to provide corrective surgery, treat with antibiotics, and he is now happily healing. This wonderful lady that rescued him is caring for him, but cannot keep him. She is working with Luvabull Rescue group to find him a home. He is young, healthy, and very friendly – so we believe he will find a good home soon.

 

 

The reason I’m writing about this (not just because it seems to have a happy ending) is that there is an educational opportunity here. The previous owner of Buddy tried to neuter him using a technique called ‘Banding’. Banding is a routinely done method for neutering livestock, mainly young sheep and cattle. The tight rubber band restricts circulation causing the scrotum and testicles to shrivel and eventually just fall off with little complication. Unfortunately sometimes it occurs to people that if it works on sheep and cattle, why not on a dog! So we’ve seen a few cases like this over the years and I’ve spoken to colleagues in the profession that have seen numerous cases as well. The problem is that it doesn’t work on dogs. They’re anatomy is different enough such that instead of cutting off circulation, the band just cuts into the skin creating a large wound. Dog’s lick the wound and inadvertently perpetuate infection. So . . .  it’s a mess!

 

 

We just want to pass the word and try to educate people that ‘Banding’ is not an acceptable way to neuter dogs. From a legal standpoint it is considered animal abuse. There are readily available avenues for neutering in our community. We perform many surgeries including neutering, we use safe anesthetic protocols, sterile surgical technique, plus pre and post operative pain control. We do our best to provide this at a discounted service to encourage spaying and neutering for the sake of reducing pet over-population problems. Even though we do our best to keep costs down, understandably they can be a limitation for some people. We are fortunate to have two low cost spay and neuter clinics in our area, Willamette Animal Guild and Eugene Spay and Neuter Clinic. So, people have numerous options.

 

 

In Buddy’s case we feel that he’s had the best possible outcome (not that more dogs should be abandoned at Safeway!).  A great deal of credit goes to our good Samaritan who rescued him, is fostering him, authorized us to do corrective surgery, and is coordinating with Luvabull to find him a home. We are glad to have played a roll in his happy outcome (anticipating that it will continue to be a happy outcome!). If you would like to contact Luvabull, their information is = http://luvabulladoptions-com.webs.com/