CORONA VIRUS!

Q Street Animal Hospital’s
COVID-19 Action Plan

Modified Hours due to COVID-19: Monday-Friday, 8AM to 5PM
Saturdays, 8AM to 12PM (excluding holiday weekends)

OUR POLICY IS EVOLVING. OUR PRIORITY IS TO PROVIDE CARE TO PETS THAT ARE IN NEED, WHILE PROMOTING SOCIAL DISTANCING TO SUPPRESS THE SPREAD OF COVID-19

1. Please call us from the parking lot when you arrive. If you do not have a phone, knock or open the front door and let us know that you are here. After that, we will give you further guidance either by phone or by coming out to your car. If you need to come up to the clinic (i.e. don’t have a cell phone, or can’t get a hold of us), limit it to one person per pet, and wear a mask or facial covering.

2. If you are exhibiting respiratory symptoms, please let us know. It is best if you not come to the clinic at all, but if you do – it is important to let us know so that we can take appropriate precautions.

3. We are doing exams for pets that are sick. We are doing surgeries and dentals for pets that need a procedure to relieve eminent underlying pain, discomfort, or disease. We are refilling medications as normal.

4. Annual exams and routine vaccines may be delayed for several weeks to minimize exposure and spread of COVID-19. Surgeries such as spays and neuters may be delayed to also reduce exposure, but also to reduce use of personal protective gear such as gowns, masks, and gloves.

5. We are doing Curb-side appointments, meaning that we will bring your pet into the clinic while you wait in your car. The Doctor will then call you to discuss diagnostic and treatment plans. We are certainly sensitive to certain circumstances such as euthanasia, and will make accommodations.

6. Drop-off appointments are also available, in which you leave your pet with us for part of the day. We will do an exam and call you to discuss (again) diagnostic and treatment plans.

7. We are offering Exams via phone as well. There is a $42 consult fee. We can also view images and possibly video from our email for consult exams (reception.qstreetanimalhospital@gmail.com). Normally, an in-person exam is required for diagnostic and treatment plans, but because of COVID-19 – the rules from the state are allowing for “tele-medicine” appointments.

8. It is unlikely that COVID-19 can infect pets at this time. However, pets are susceptible to other respiratory diseases. If your pet is exhibiting symptoms of respiratory disease, then call to discuss and possibly schedule an exam.

**Please be aware that we are experiencing an extremely high volume of phone calls, and ask that our clients continue to be patient with us during this very uncertain time. We are also scheduling many appointments several weeks to a month out since we are so booked at this time. Call us at (541) 746-8491 to discuss availability.

(THE FOLLOWING PROVIDES MORE DETAILS)

The health and safety of our clients, their pets and our employees is our top priority during this period of uncertainty with the corona virus (COVID-19). We are doing everything we can to provide a safe and sanitary experience for you and your pet without compromising the quality of our services.

We are following the latest information and protocols from the world’s leading health experts and government authorities, including the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and World Health Organization (WHO). We have implemented the recommended social distancing measures in the workplace as much as possible and ask that if you are exhibiting symptoms such as a fever, cough, shortness of breath or breathing difficulties that you not come in to the clinic, but call us so that we can figure out the best way to make sure your pet is seen. We are also asking that people wait in their cars as much as possible to decrease the number of people in the waiting room and limit your pet’s companion to 1 person in the examination room.

We have increased our stringent practices of sanitation, disinfection and cleaning throughout the building. There is hand sanitizer available in several locations and a restroom equipped with antiseptic soap. We have instituted a policy for employees to stay home from work if they have a fever or any respiratory symptoms.

Spring Health Awareness!

 

 

Spring into action

By: Megan Elias

 

Spring is one of my favorite seasons. We’ve all heard that proverbial phrase April showers bring May flowers but something we may forget is spring can bring some potential hazards for our furry friends. It is important as pet O’s to know what those hazards are and how to prevent them. Some of those hazards include leptospirosis, plant toxicity and slug/snail bait.

Leptospirosis:

Leptospirosis sounds pretty scary and it can affect people as well as dogs. It is an organism that can be picked up by the ingestion of stagnate water that an infected animal has urinated in. Life stock and wild life are the most common carriers of the bacteria. In an article Written by Wendy Brooks DVM she states “Leptospira interrogates sensu lato [leptospirosis] has been sub-classified into smaller related groups called serovars. Over 250 serovars have been named and at least 10 are important for pets.” (https://veterinarypartner.vin.com/). Despite the number of serovars, there are things you can do to prevent infection.

Those April showers bring stagnate water so one of the easiest ways to thwart the contagion is to steer clear of puddles and be cautious about what you let your dog drink out of. If possible remove any standing water from your yard and try to minimize your pet’s exposure to animals that you are not familiar with.  Another easy way to prevent some of the most common strands of leptospirosis is to vaccinate. Although vaccinating may not prevent all strands it can reduce the austerity of the disease.

 

Plant Toxicity:

Spring is most known for its new growth. After our cold Oregon winters the site of blooming flowers is typically a signal of hope for slightly warmer weather. However some of the new growth presents hazardous to our animals. Upon ingestion animals can develop diarrhea, vomiting and hyper salivation. Certain plants can even cause kidney/liver failure, respiratory distress and death. The severity of the reaction varies significantly depending on what is ingested. Some of the most common toxic plants include lilies, azalea/rhododendrons, foxglove, tulips, daffodils and crocus. Visit The Pet Poison Helpline for a more detailed list of plants to be weary of and if you feel your animal has ingested a toxic plant call your veterinarian right away (https://www.petpoisonhelpline.com/).

It is frightening to think that something so beautiful could be the source of such harm but that is why it is vital to know which plants cause problems.  Avoiding pernicious plants is the most effortless way to reduce consumption but we realize that is not always practical. Our recommendation is to keep your pet on a leash when you are in an unfamiliar area. If you have plants in your home try finding a high place or a hanging basket that your pet can not access.

Slug/Snail Bait:

Those beautiful flowers can bring unwanted slimy pests and no one wants hole in their plants. The pests are usually repelled with your garden variety bait which presents as yet another threat to our companion animals. Toxicities in dogs seem to be more common than in cats and is provoked when the dog licks or eats the deterrent.  The most routinely used ingredient in baits is called metaldehyde and consumption can cause a plethora of problems. Any dose of metaldehyde 2 mg/kg or greater in dogs warrants decontamination (ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center [APCC].  An animal can experience rapid breathing, seizures, hyper sensitivity and fever. All these symptoms would require the attention of a veterinarian.

Similar to reducing the consumption of plants one of the simplest ways to avoid slug and snail bait is to keep your pet on a leash and be aware of your surroundings. Additionally a safer alternative to metaldehyde is iron phosphate. Unfortunately Iron phosphate is not as effective as the former. Keeping your animal busy with a toy can distract them enough to prevent them from ingesting things they are not supposed to.

In conclusion keeping your animals happy and healthy is one of our top priorities. By springing in to action and taking preventative measures you can have an enjoyable season without urgent trips to your veterinarian.

Canine Influenza

What Is Dog Flu? (Article from AKC website)

Dog flu, or canine influenza virus, is an infectious respiratory disease caused by an influenza A virus, similar to the viral strains that cause influenza in people. There are two known strains of dog flu found in the United States:

  • H3N8
  • H3N2

The H3N8 strain actually originated in horses. The virus jumped from horses to dogs, becoming a canine influenza virus around 2004, when the first outbreaks affected racing Greyhounds at a track in Florida.

H3N2, on the other hand, originated in Asia, where scientists believe it jumped from birds to dogs. H3N2 is the virus responsible for the 2015 and 2016 outbreaks of canine influenza in the Midwest and continues to spread throughout the United States.

How Is Canine Influenza Spread?

Like human forms of influenza, dog flu is airborne. Respiratory secretions escape into the environment in the form of coughing, barking, and sneezing, where they are then inhaled by a new canine host. The dog flu also spreads through contaminated objects and environments, like water bowls, collars, and kennel surfaces, or through contact with people who have had direct contact with an infected dog.

Crowded areas like kennels, grooming parlors, day care centers, and dog parks are breeding grounds for diseases like canine influenza. The close proximity of the dogs means that a barking, coughing, or sneezing dog can easily infect canines around him. This is made more dangerous by the fact that dogs are most contagious during the incubation period before they start exhibiting symptoms.

How Long Are Dogs Infected With Dog Flu Contagious?

The incubation period of canine influenza is approximately 2-to-4 days from initial exposure to the dog flu virus. Viral shedding starts to decrease after the fourth day, but dogs with H3N8 remain contagious for up to 10 days after exposure, and dogs with H3N2 remain contagious for up to 26 days. Most vets recommend isolating dogs with H3N2 for at least 21 days to reduce the risk of transmission.

Almost all dogs that come into contact with the disease will contract it, but not all dogs that become infected show symptoms of the virus. About 20-25 percent of dogs infected are asymptomatic, but these dogs can still spread the disease. If one of your canine companions catches the flu, but the other seems unaffected, remember that he could still have the virus. Talk to your vet about quarantine procedures for all dogs in your household.

Symptoms of Dog Flu

So, how do you know if your pup has dog flu? There are several symptoms all owners should be aware of. Dog flu cases range from mild to severe and, unlike human influenzas, are not seasonal. Keep an eye out for the following symptoms year-round:

  • Coughing (both moist and dry)
  • Sneezing
  • Nasal discharge
  • Purulent nasal discharge
  • Runny eyes
  • Fever
  • Lethargy
  • Difficulty breathing

Dog flu symptoms resemble kennel cough symptoms, which is also an illness you should talk to your veterinarian about as soon as you notice symptoms.

Most cases of dog flu are mild, but severe cases do occur. In those instances, dogs develop pneumonia, difficulty breathing, and a high fever. Luckily, the mortality rate is relatively low, with less than 10 percent of dog flu cases resulting in fatalities.

Treating Dog Flu

The canine influenza virus requires the attention of a veterinarian. In some states, vets are required to report cases of canine influenza to the government to help monitor the spread of the disease.

There is no cure for dog flu. Treatment is supportive, and your veterinarian can advise you on the best ways to keep your dog comfortable during his illness and recovery. Some dogs may require supportive care, such as fluids, to aid their recovery, as well as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications to reduce fevers. Your vet will help you come up with a nutritional plan and may prescribe antibiotics to treat secondary bacterial infections.

Your vet will also inform you about appropriate quarantine procedures to prevent the spread of dog flu, depending on the strain of the virus your dog contracts, and can give you information about disinfectant solutions to use in your home to help kill the virus.

Call your vet ahead of time to let her know that your dog is showing symptoms of a respiratory infection. Both kennel cough and dog flu are highly contagious, and your vet may request that you keep your dog outside until your appointment time to prevent the risk of transmission to other patients in the waiting room.

Preventing Dog Flu

The best way to prevent your dog from contracting dog flu is to keep him away from public places or kennels with recently reported cases. If you come into contact with a dog that you suspect has dog flu or has recently been exposed to it, wash your hands, arms, and clothing before touching your own dog. This will reduce the risk of transmission from you to your dog.

There are vaccines available for both the H3N8 and H3N2 strains of canine influenza. Your vet may recommend the vaccine based on your lifestyle. For instance, if you live in an area with a high incidence of dog flu or if your dog regularly spends time in kennels or travels to shows around the country, then he could be at an increased risk of contracting canine influenza and your vet may recommend the vaccine as a precaution.

 

www.akc.org/expert-advice/health/the-dog-flu-symptoms-you-need-to-know/

Salmon Poison

Salmon Poisoning
Salmon Poisoning can be a life-threatening disease to dogs, coyotes, and foxes. The classic symptoms are enlarged lymph nodes, fever, diarrhea, and vomiting. However, they do not always follow this classic pattern and cases are sometimes tricky. The disease is diagnosed by visualizing fluke eggs in a stool sample. In some cases, the stool is so watery that even getting a stool sample is difficult and the diagnostic procedure can be prone to false negatives. Having a history of the dog having eaten raw salmon or trout within the last 1-2 weeks also helps make the diagnosis.
The disease process is interesting because the fish itself doesn’t cause the disease. There is a parasite within the fish known as a fluke (specifically Nanophyetus salmincola), BUT the fluke itself also doesn’t cause the disease, rather bacteria (Neorickettsia helminthoeca) within the fluke THAT CAUSE the DISEASE. Once the larval flukes reach the dog’s intestinal tract, they embed in the dog’s duodenal mucosa, and release the rickettsiae. The rickettsial organisms then spread through the bloodstream to the liver, lungs, brain, and lymphoid tissue.
If it is caught at a reasonable stage it can be treated. Most cases require hospitalization, intravenous fluid support, and intravenous antibiotics. Dogs that survive salmon poisoning will be immune to re-infection with the same strain. However, infection with an alternate strain can occur because there is no cross-protection.